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Practical life: Pegging

Whilst pegging might sound like a basic skill it has many important developmental benefits. This simple activity requires patience, concentration, dexterity and good eye-hand coordination, plus it strengthens fingers and develops the all-important pincer grip that is essential for writing. In a Montessori classroom, children will practise pegging with a basket and pegs; using their […]

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Ten top tips for reducing screen time at home

We don’t know what Maria Montessori would have said about screen time (as there were no screens when she was around) but we do know that her educational model placed emphasis on children from 0-6 learning in a hands-on way with a focus on the sensorial; the need to manipulate their environment in order to […]

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Cultural: Parts of a frog

A primary focus of Montessori learning is to inspire children’s natural curiosity and our cultural lesson on parts of a frog does just that. Frogs are strange little creatures and it is great fun to think a bit more about their lifecycle and role in the ecosystem but to start, we like to teach children […]

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Mathematics: Estimation Jar

The purpose of the estimation jar is not only to practise counting and problem solving but to develop curiosity about numbers and maths. What might sound like a simple guessing game (and, really, it is that simple) takes on levels of complexity as your child grows and develops. For this activity, you’ll need a variety […]

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Practical Life: Bubble Making

In the Practical Life area of a Montessori classroom, you will find children pouring, spooning, scooping, sponging, slicing, spreading ladling, and using tongs and tweezers to transfer items. It’s where they explore, chat and concentrate, too. Bubble making is an extension of the practical life curriculum, teaching order (systematic following of steps to achieve a […]

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Practical Life: Hama Beads

Hama beads—did you know that these are often used in Montessori classrooms? You probably have some buried in every crevice, nook and cranny in your home but they are absolutely worth digging out because of their educational value as well as the fun factor. All you’ll need for the activity to be demonstrated in the […]

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Make your own mud kitchen

Maria Montessori advocated for children to have free access to the outdoors, with no separation between the indoor and outdoor classroom. This is something we can encourage at home. Nature, in and of itself, is an incredible teacher and the space of the outdoors facilitates growth, energy and creativity but preparing an outside-activity for children […]

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Helping children into a routine

As families and communities, we are wading our way through masses of uncertainty at the minute, which can be quite stressful. What helps is having a regular routine or rhythm at home—this is good for us as parents but it’s especially important for our children. When they know the plan, they feel secure and this […]

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Top tips for decluttering your child’s room

The tinsel is tucked away, wrapping paper recycled and the new year is upon us—as are piles and piles of toys, which seem to have a knack of taking over before we’ve noticed. That said, it’s never too late to declutter and actually, just-after-Christmas is the perfect time because children will be have some new […]

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Mathematics: Teen Board

The traditional Montessori Teen Board is used to show children how tens and ones make teens; it is a visual and physical application of building numbers to enable understanding. Quite specific materials are used for the lesson: a teen board as well as bead bars but as with most Montessori lessons, once you’ve understood both […]

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What to do with your child’s artwork

Children love to create and in a Montessori classroom, a work of art is about the process more than the end result – sometimes your child might come home with something that is precious to them and other times children might not feel any connection to their creation. Whatever the outcome of the creative process, […]