No matter the topic of discussion at school, we always enjoy a hands-on approach that allows the children to truly immerse themselves in the magic of whatever we are learning about. And when it came to Great White Sharks, the children were abuzz with ideas and excitement! Have a look at their artistry:

The artwork the children produced is quite brilliant – loaded with character, movement and energy – but it is important to remember that when it comes to exploration through art in a Montessori context, the process is more important than the product.

Whilst the end-goal or final product is usually whet’s critical for adults, it is not so for children. Children interact with the world differently, working to develop ‘self’; this makes the process rather than the product of deeper significance. Art is a manner of expression and also a way for children to communicate their feelings (without even realising they are doing so!).

And, of course, art is also a great way to develop fine motor skills – although this was not likely high on the agenda when the St Andrew’s children were bringing the Great Whites to life in an enthusiastic frenzy of paint, pen and cardboard. The joy of art is that the mechanical skills (like FMS) develop anyway, unintentionally!

The point is that art is uninhibited when practiced by children and as much as we enjoy seeing the final product, we allow them to revel in the creative process.

If you have any questions regarding Montessori schooling and methodology, we’d love to chat more with you – please visit our contact page and we’ll be in touch.

Photo by Stoica Ionela on Unsplash